Species


11 different wood species to create décors that really shine

Learn more about the origin,characteristics, and hardness of Mirage wood species, and most importantly, the look they bring to the rooms you design. Discover a host of useful information to help you pick personalized décors that provide years of satisfaction.

Domestic and exotic species — which ones will you choose to create the perfect ambiance in your projects?

Mirage floors are in compliance with the Lacey Act, which protects against illegal forest practices.

*The Janka hardness test measures the force required to embed a 0.444 inch steel ball into wood. This test is also used to determine the degree of difficulty in sawing and nailing. Red Oak is the reference species for comparing wood hardness.

Brazilian Cherry Hardness: 2350 lbs.

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Brazilian Cherry
The look of Brazilian Cherry

Jatoba wood has a golden luster. Its texture ranges from medium to coarse, with an interwoven grain. In its natural state, Jatoba shows very pronounced color variation when exposed to intense light.

The sapwood of Jatoba may be white, gray, or pink. The heartwood ranges from salmon to orange-brown when freshly cut. With age, it turns a rusty brown and is often marked with dark stripes.

Jatoba shows full, rich color through the entire thickness of the wood, which helps to hide wear marks.

Jatoba: An evocative look that leaves a lasting impression!

The colors of Brazilian Cherry
Natural
The Facts on Brazilian Cherry

Jatoba can be found in southern Mexico, throughout Central America, and as far south as northern Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru. It grows best on the crests and sides of mountains or on high riverbanks. Jatoba can attain a height of 130 ft. (40 m) and a diameter of 4 ft. (1.2 m). The trunk is well formed, often smooth for 40 to 80 ft. (12.2 to 24.4 m).

Santos Mahogany Hardness: 2200 lbs.

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Santos Mahogany
The look of Santos Mahogany

Cabreuva has a generally uniform and straight grain and a texture ranging from fine to medium. The color falls between yellow and rosy red or salmon when the tree is freshly cut, or reddish brown when the tree is mature. If exposed to intense light, it can show moderate to very pronounced color variation.

Cabreuva shows full, rich color through the entire thickness of the wood, which helps to hide wear marks.

Cabreuva: An exotic shade for exquisite style!

The colors of Santos Mahogany
Natural
The Facts on Santos Mahogany

Cabreuva is found primarily in Central America and Brazil. Cabreuva trees can attain a height of 150 ft. (45 m) and a diameter sometimes exceeding 4 ft. (1.2 m).

Hickory Hardness: 1820 lbs.

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Hickory
The look of Hickory

Hickory is a dense, highly resistant wood. It is coarse, and the grain is generally straight but occasionally wavy. The color of hickory varies in tone from dark brown to blond beige, even changing slightly to a golden hue. This species also features knots that accentuate its natural character. To preserve the wood's elegance for years to come, Mirage applies a UV protector at the finishing stage.

The sapwood of Hickory is white shaded with brown, and its heartwood is light to reddish brown.

Hickory is natural!

The colors of Hickory
Hickory
Seashell
Greystone
Sierra
Barn Wood
Tree Bark
Fossil
Savanna
Umbria
The Facts on Hickory

Hickory is generally found from southern Ontario to northern Florida, especially in southern New England and throughout Kentucky. The tree likes moist climates. It usually grows on sloping and relatively dry ground, but it can also be found in wetter soil. Hickory can reach up to 121 ft (37 m) in height. Its trunk can grow to 3.9 ft (1.20 m) in diameter at the base. It has a large vertical root radial, as well as some smaller roots.

Sapele Hardness: 1500 lbs.

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Sapele
The look of Sapele

Sapele is a fine-textured wood with an interwoven or wavy grain. Moderate to pronounced color variation may occur when this species is exposed to intense light.

The sapwood of Sapele is white or pale yellow. The heartwood is pink when freshly cut but becomes reddish brown or purplish brown with age. Sapele shows full, rich color through the entire thickness of the wood, which helps to hide wear marks.

Sapele: Decorate your home with exotic beauty!

The colors of Sapele
Natural
The Facts on Sapele

Sapele ranges from Ivory Coast to Cameroon, and eastwards to the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda. It can attain a height of 150 to 200 ft. (45 to 60 m). The trunk is straight, cylindrical, and branchless up to 100 ft. (30 m), with a diameter of 4 to 6 ft. (1.2 to 1.8 m). In some cases, the base of the tree spreads as roots form offshoots from the ground.

African Mahogany Hardness: 1500 lbs.

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African Mahogany
The look of African Mahogany

Sapele is a fine-textured wood with an interwoven or wavy grain. Moderate to pronounced color variation may occur when this species is exposed to intense light.

The sapwood of Sapele is white or pale yellow. The heartwood is pink when freshly cut but becomes reddish brown or purplish brown with age. Sapele shows full, rich color through the entire thickness of the wood, which helps to hide wear marks.

Sapele: Decorate your home with exotic beauty!

The colors of African Mahogany
Brass
Henna
Onyx
The Facts on African Mahogany

Sapele ranges from Ivory Coast to Cameroon, and eastwards to the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda. It can attain a height of 150 to 200 ft. (45 to 60 m). The trunk is straight, cylindrical, and branchless up to 100 ft. (30 m), with a diameter of 4 to 6 ft. (1.2 to 1.8 m). In some cases, the base of the tree spreads as roots form offshoots from the ground.

Maple Hardness: 1450 lbs.

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Maple
The look of Maple

Maple has a close grain that gives it a soft, even texture. While the grain is generally straight, it can also appear curly, wavy, or striped. Sometimes there is pronounced color variation when maple is exposed to intense light, although a UV protector applied during the manufacture of flooring limits this variation.

Maple sapwood is generally white with a slight reddish-brown tint: the heartwood is reddish brown and sometimes quite dark.

Maple: A timeless classic!

The colors of Maple
Nordic
Snowdrift
Maple Select And Better
White Mist
Rio
Hudson
Papyrus
Sand Dune
Grey Drizzle
Windsor
Sonora
Nevada
Nougat
Sierra
Linen
Sandstone
Auburn
Greystone
Rock Cliff
Dark Leaf
Toffee
Praline
Gingerbread
Platinum
Savanna
North Hatley
Charcoal
Canyon
Newport
Bolton
Havana
Waterloo
Umbria
Black Jelly Bean
Coffee
Vienna
Java
Sambuca
Graphite
The Facts on Maple

There are 13 species of maple in North America, 10 of which grow in Canada. Hard Maple is found in the eastern United States and Canada. Maple syrup is produced from the sap. Hard Maple can reach a height of 120 ft. (37 m) and a diameter of 3 ft. (1 m). In the forest, maples can have a clear trunk, free of branches for up to 60 ft. (18 m).

Hard Maple and Black Maple are hardwoods. Other species, such as Silver and Red Maple are considered softwoods. Some manufacturers offer maple floors without specifying that they are using soft species. These floors are much less impact-resistant.

Marks, scratches, or imperfections are more noticeable because of the close, even grain and pale color. The more open grain of oak and ash hides marks better. A matte finish will help make marks less noticeable.

White Oak Hardness: 1360 lbs.

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White Oak
The look of White Oak

The grain of White Oak is similar to that of Red Oak. Its color ranges from light creamy beige to grayish brown. White Oak will undergo moderate color changes overtime, taking on a slightly amber tone. It is essentially a straight-grained wood with a medium to coarse texture and longer rays than Red Oak. To maintain the wood's elegance for many years, Mirage applies a UV protector at the finishing stage.

The sapwood of White Oak is almost white, while the heartwood is grayish brown.

White Oak: So beautiful by nature!

The colors of White Oak
Snowdrift
Carousel
White Mist
Isla
Treasure
Old White Oak R&Q
Grey Drizzle
Sand Dune
Château
Hopscotch
Dark Leaf
Urbana
Terra
Tree House
Sepia
The Facts on White Oak

White Oak grows in a wide variety of soil types and ranges from southern Quebec and Ontario to Georgia in the United States. This species prefers a warm, humid climate and does not like overly harsh winters. White Oak can grow up to 35 m (115 ft.) tall, with a trunk 50 to 120 cm (20 to 47 in.) in diameter.

Red Oak Hardness: 1290 lbs.

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Red Oak
The look of Red Oak

Red Oak has a generally even grain. Because it grows slowly, oak is notable for having many growth rings on each board. Variations in color are very limited over time, even if it is exposed to intense light. Nevertheless, Mirage applies a UV protector at the finishing stage to preserve all the luster of its original color.

The sapwood of the oak ranges from white to pale brown, while the heartwood is reddish brown.

Ordinary wear and tear is hardly noticeable due to oak's open grain and natural reddish color.

Oak: Rich color, classic style!

The colors of Red Oak
Nordic
Carousel
Isla
Red Oak Exclusive
Rio
Château
Treasure
Hopscotch
Oakland
Hudson
Golden
Sonora
Papyrus
Nevada
Sierra
Windsor
Stanford
Tree Bark
Barn Wood
Seashell
Linen
Rock Cliff
Terra
Urbana
Sandstone
Colorado
Farnham
North Hatley
Fossil
Auburn
Tree House
Savanna
Platinum
Eastman
Sepia
Waterloo
Knowlton
Rich Oak
Bolton
Portland
Charcoal
Canyon
Stanstead
Newport
Havana
Coffee
Umbria
Vienna
Java
Graphite
Sambuca
The Facts on Red Oak

More than 200 subspecies of oak are found in North America. The Northern Red Oak is found all over the eastern United States and in the southeast of Canada. However, because of the climate, the northern and southern Red Oak are different. Further north, the harsher winters slow growth and yield a harder wood. Trees can reach a height of 125 ft. (38 m) and considerable diameter.

Yellow Birch Hardness: 1260 lbs.

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Yellow Birch
The look of Yellow Birch

Yellow Birch is a species with a close, straight grain that gives it a relatively even texture. Its boards sometimes have a curly or wavy look. Even when exposed to intense light, Yellow Birch has the advantage of showing minimal color variation. To maintain the wood's elegance for many years, Mirage applies a UV protector at the finishing stage.

Yellow Birch is a creamy yellow or pale white: its heartwood is reddish-brown with red highlights.

Yellow Birch: For décor that inspires elegance!

The colors of Yellow Birch
Yellow Birch Select And Better
Hudson
Rio
Windsor
Sierra
Nougat
Sonora
Auburn
Greystone
Platinum
Praline
Savanna
North Hatley
Gingerbread
Charcoal
Rich Oak
Newport
Bolton
Havana
Waterloo
Black Jelly Bean
Canyon
Umbria
Coffee
Vienna
Java
The Facts on Yellow Birch

Yellow Birch grows primarily in Quebec, the northeastern United States, and the Great Lakes region. It can reach a height of 70 ft. (21 m) and a diameter of 2 ft. (0.6 m).

Marks, scratches, or imperfections are more visible on Yellow Birch because of its close, even grain and pale color. The coarser grain of oak and ash hides marks better. A matte finish will help make marks less noticeable.

American Walnut Hardness: 1010 lbs.

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American Walnut
The look of American Walnut

American Walnut is a wood with moderate hardness. The color difference between its sapwood and heartwood is very pronounced, which results in significant variations in color and grain between boards. Walnut shows minimal color variation when exposed to intense light. Unlike other species, walnut tends to lighten over time.

Walnut sapwood is creamy white and sometimes tan, with heartwood ranging from rich dark brown to purplish black.

Walnut: Simply stunning!

The colors of American Walnut
Knotty Walnut
Savanna
Colorado
Charcoal
The Facts on American Walnut

American Walnut is found primarily in the eastern United States, but it is also present in the American Midwest. Walnut can attain a height of 37 m (120 ft.) and a diameter of 1 m (3 ft.).

Marks, scratches, and imperfections are more obvious on walnut because of its hardness and density. A matte finish will help make marks less noticeable.